The Star Spangled Banner

The National Anthem 

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11 thoughts on “The Star Spangled Banner

          1. What about the rest of disabled people? They can’t possibly include everyone, though they should. Especially if the signing could easily be substituted by subtitles. Signing is very important for events such as live speeches and such, but for a song that is that well known, subtitles can do the trick.

            Liked by 1 person

            1. Comment by deafgaming:
              Marlee Matlin’s performance at Super Bowl 50 is a fantastic depiction of ableism and audism. “But Morgan, there was a deaf interpreter/performer at the Super Bowl aren’t you happy?” No. And let me tell you why.

              For those of you who are unfamiliar, Marlee Matlin is an actress and pioneer in Deaf-talent, as well as a Global Globe winner and a receiver of several Emmy nominations. This woman has done many incredible things and has been an inspiration to the entire Deaf community. When it was announced she would be performing alongside Lady Gaga, the entire Deaf community was ecstatic since this would be a huge step for deaf rights. But the complete opposite happened. Marlee Matlin was shown on live television for no more than a generous 3 seconds, and was never even allowed on the stage where Lady Gaga sang, but instead stood in the sidelines. The only way to access the full performance was by going online and watching it there.

              There are a million ways to show both performances at full measure on television. It’s the 21st century! There is absolutely no excuse for this. It’s not like deaf people can’t read or anything. Deaf people could easily have just used captions. The entire point was that Marlee Matlin was going to perform our nation’s anthem live on television. Sign Language needs to be seen in order to receive full appreciation. By downplaying her performance and limiting accessibility/publicity, it is actually setting a huge example for the 35 million deaf/hoh american citizens. This is telling these individuals that they are an inconvenience and that their culture and access does not matter. This is showing all the little deaf boys and girls that they are not allowed to enjoy things that hearing people do just because they are different. Being deaf is already hard enough in this hearing dominated world, so why make it harder than it has to be on deaf people?

              Liked by 2 people

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